Can a card game be something more than just a game? Surviving in a concentration camp was like playing dice with death. The imaginary disarmament of the enemy – it`s a game where the results aren’t obvious, but can still be appreciated. Can a card game be something more than just a game? Surviving in a concentration camp was like playing dice with death. The imaginary disarmament of the enemy – it`s a game where the results aren’t obvious, but can still be appreciated.

Ace of Diamonds, Coffin of Pine

"The deck of fate is whimsically shuffled," Bulgakov once said of the inscrutability of the intricacies of fate. "What is our life? A game!" - argued the opera The Queen of Spades. As long as playing cards have existed, people have looked for hidden meanings and messages in them. Can a card game be more than that? Yes. It can. A prisoner's survival in a concentration camp is a game with death. Morally disarming the enemy is a game with secret, powerful trump cards. Making a small ideological "bomb" in a besieged city is a game of overcoming monstrous obstacles. Our team have picked up three unique decks of anti-fascist cards, each with its own striking story behind it. A story of a difficult game, a perfect combination, and an unconditional win by a landslide.
Fragment of the 'Victory Day Parade' diorama at the Central Museum of the Russian Armed Forces in MoscowFragment of the 'Victory Day Parade' diorama at the Central Museum of the Russian Armed Forces in Moscow

Victory Parade in Miniature

Today is the anniversary of the Victory Parade of 1945 on Red Square in Moscow. Why was the road in front of Marshal Zhukov marked with white paint? How could sappers be distinguished from miners and infantrymen by the sound of their footsteps? What did the sailors do to keep their berets from being blown away by the wind? Russian artist and engraver Vladimir Nuzhdin, who created the unique “Victory Parade” diorama, told the “Nuremberg: Casus Pacis” project about all of the above and the difficulty of portraying the largest parade in Russian history.
Mikhail Loshchits and Tamara Grabovenko, 1946Mikhail Loshchits and Tamara Grabovenko, 1946

That German Was Our Friend

My grandfather Mikhail Fedorovich Loshchits (1917-2015) went through the war from the first to the last day. He served as a military journalist on the Leningrad front. He was an instructor in the political department of a division, a secretary, and then an editor of the divisional newspaper “In the line of duty”. The story “On the Last Day of the War” tells a little-known episode – the surrender of a group of German troops ambushed in the so-called Courland Pocket in western Latvia. It was only on 8 May that fierce fighting stopped there, however, some units resisted until the end of the month.

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