A copy of The World is Judging, a painting by Nikolai Zhukov. Nuremberg Trials exhibition.A copy of The World is Judging, a painting by Nikolai Zhukov. Nuremberg Trials exhibition.

We Tried to Understand, But We Could Not

The Nuremberg Tribunal was also known by its nickname "The Trial of Six Million Words" because of the sheer number of column inches that were published about it. By now, of course, a good deal more than six million words have been written about the event, what with all the histories that have been written. But at the time, between November 1945 and October 1946, there were 315 journalists and writers from 31 countries covering the moment when a whole cast of murdering fascist criminals were brought to justice, filing thousands of articles and essays while the army of photographers who were present at the tribunal took at least 25,000 pictures and made several dozen films.
Interpreters at a session of the International Military Tribunal.Interpreters at a session of the International Military Tribunal.

The Nuremberg Trials Wouldn’t Have Taken Place Without Interpreters

At the Nuremberg Trials, everything was a first - including the debut of international simultaneous interpretation. The new practice of interpretation was invented and introduced at the tribunal - "simultaneous interpretation" was necessary for the new world, which was going to live on without war. Countries and people managed to come to an agreement in every sense: a common space for dialogue was provided by interpreters, who bore perhaps the greatest responsibility and who had never done anything like this before or since. The Soviet interpreters had a particularly difficult time - and they passed the unprecedented test with flying colours.
Nuremberg trial, 1945Nuremberg trial, 1945

In-Between Genocide & Crimes Against Humanity

The Nuremberg Trials were the first of their kind in history, turning into a judgment against a regime and an entire era - the Nazi period that gripped Germany for one and a half decades. It gave a powerful impetus to the development of international law. In particular, it introduced the concept of "crimes against humanity" that we use today. The forging of a new term, a key one for the advancement of human rights, took place amid heated legal debates and even intrigues around the two concepts – "genocide" and "human rights". Georgy Bovt discusses the key legal collision for the modern world.
Obersalzberg, the Goebbels family visit Adolf Hitler, "Der Führer" is back in Obersalzberg. Doctor Goebbels and his wife, accompanied by their children Helga, Hilde and HelmutObersalzberg, the Goebbels family visit Adolf Hitler, "Der Führer" is back in Obersalzberg. Doctor Goebbels and his wife, accompanied by their children Helga, Hilde and Helmut

‘Hitler Was Centre of Our Lives’: Confessions of Nazi Criminals’ Wives

“I was unable to understand how the wives of all those sitting in the dock not only could meet them every day at home, sit with them at the same table and share their joys and sorrows, but also could whisper tender words to them, accept their caresses and love them and give birth to their children. I have never doubted that the wives were in the know about the criminal acts of their husbands”. From Tatyana Stupnikova’s book titled “Nothing but the truth. Nuremberg Trials. Memoirs of a Translator”.

Language selection