Arthur Seyss-InquartArthur Seyss-Inquart

Making a Catholic Gentleman a Nazi Criminal

Arthur Seyss-Inquart was one of the major figures in the Nuremberg Trials and played a major role in the Anschluss, the annexation of Austria by Germany in 1938, as well as the extermination of Jews. Some admired him as Hitler’s right-hand man in Austria, while others despised him, mockingly referring to him as “six and a quarter”. The Führer retained his faith in Seyss-Inquart until the last day of his life, and the Сourt was equally assured of his guilt.
View of the defendants in the dock at the International Military Tribunal trial of war criminals in Nuremberg, Bavaria, GermanyView of the defendants in the dock at the International Military Tribunal trial of war criminals in Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany

Interrogation, In-Person and Face-to-Face

On 28 November, witness testimony was presented for the first time at the court session. It was read out, because the witness himself was in the Western hemisphere. The document was an affidavit executed by George S. Messersmith, a former consul general of the United States of America in Berlin, who, due to his high diplomatic post, had witnessed Germany's preparation for aggression. The defence was on its feet: why wouldn't an American diplomat appear in court and be cross-examined? Sergei Miroshnichenko, a lawyer and international law scholar, explained how the International Military Court resolved such disputes.

Nazi Occupiers Killed Almost 16 Million Soviet Citizens

Over 2,000 documents from the Extraordinary State Commission (CHGK) have been published to date, both previously available and recently declassified, as part of the All-Russian Project “No Statute of Limitation”. They contain detailed data on human and material losses. The CHGK materials prove that the Nazi terror in the occupied territories was planned and systematic. Under existing international law, the acts of the occupiers in the USSR fall under the definition of genocide.
Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler

Key Evidence Against Hitler

On 26 November at 10 a.m., US lawyer Sidney Alderman appeared before the prosecutor’s stand. His mission was to prove to the International Military Tribunal that Germany had planned the war long before it began. Alderman presented the tribunal with what he called the Hossbach Protocol, “one of the most striking and revealing of all the captured documents which have come to hand”. Dmitry Astashkin, a specialist in Nazi war crimes and senior researcher at the Saint Petersburg Institute for History of the Russian Academy of Sciences, contributed to the understanding of the content and importance of the document.
View of the conference of the "Big Five", or Conference of the Allied Control Council for Germany, at Lancaster House in London on September 10, 1945View of the conference of the "Big Five", or Conference of the Allied Control Council for Germany, at Lancaster House in London on September 10, 1945

ICC's Principles Defined by Pre-Revolution Moscow University Graduate

For a long time, the belief that the credit for creating the judicial base for the Nuremberg Trials belongs to the United States was prevalent in the Western historiography related to said trials. Lately, however, Western historians started talking about the previous assessment being erroneous, with Soviet professor and legal scholar Aron Trainin, the man who developed the basic legal formulas for the trials, becoming the subject of several studies.
Cartoon by Boris Efimov, 1944Cartoon by Boris Efimov, 1944

Сrematorium Pipes Seen From Windows of Krupp’s Auschwitz Factory

Before Disney shaped our perception of dwarves in its animated films, they were known through German fairy tales as hardworking but morally unscrupulous craftsmen. These are apt words for describing the Krupp dynasty: its history is a synthesis of purposefulness, calculation and cynicism. The last of the Krupps industrialists did not care about the moans and groans that echoed in his factories; they were little less than a line item in the bill of sale for each gun, tank or submarine presented to the Reich. And every death (be it of a German or an enemy combatant, it didn’t matter) brought the dynasty money, rewards, and glory. Peter Romanov offers his view on the history of the dynasty.

Language selection